Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

DIY: A Jewel-Toned Easter Tablescape with Designer David Stark

Search

DIY: A Jewel-Toned Easter Tablescape with Designer David Stark

April 16, 2017

For Easter this year, NYC event designer David Stark is skipping the standard palette of pale pinks, yellows, and greens and opting instead for a moody, jewel-toned tablescape. The best part? He’s managed to go dark au naturel by dyeing a mix of white and brown eggs using only fruits and vegetables, set against a backdrop of dark blue linens, painted egg cartons, and pewter-hued plates.

Photography by Corrie Hogg of David Stark Design for Remodelista.

Finished Product

 The David Stark team paired their DIY dyed egg runner with plates from World Market, flatware from CB
Above: The David Stark team paired their DIY dyed egg runner with plates from World Market, flatware from CB2, and blue linen napkins from Canvas Home.

The Process

The team skipped the artificial dye and opted for beets, grape juice, and red cabbage instead. (The worn wood cutting board and zinc table are from Prop Workshop in NYC.)
Above: The team skipped the artificial dye and opted for beets, grape juice, and red cabbage instead. (The worn wood cutting board and zinc table are from Prop Workshop in NYC.)

Supplies:

  • Brown and white eggs
  • Red cabbage
  • Beets
  • Grape juice
  • White vinegar
  • Jars or lidded bowls
Though not required, a tea strainer and baking rack will come in handy for plucking the eggs out of the dye and letting them dry.
Above: Though not required, a tea strainer and baking rack will come in handy for plucking the eggs out of the dye and letting them dry.

Dying Eggs with Cabbage and Beets

Step 1: Hard boil your eggs (this should take from 10 to 12 minutes).

Step 2: Chop your vegetables to yield a cup and boil them in two cups of water and cook until tender. Drain the water and save in a jar or other container with a lid.

Step 3: Once the liquid has cooled, stir in one tablespoon of white vinegar.

Step 4: Carefully lower your eggs into the dye. For a light stain, soak the eggs for 30 minutes. For a dark stain, soak overnight.

By using both brown and white eggs and varying their time in the dye, David&#8
Above: By using both brown and white eggs and varying their time in the dye, David’s team produced myriad color variations using only three dyes.

Dying Eggs with Grape Juice

Step 1: Hard boil your eggs (this should take from 10 to 12 minutes).

Step 2: Mix one tablespoon of white vinegar with two cups of grape juice in a jar or container with a lid.

Step 3: Carefully lower your eggs into the dye. Again, vary soaking times for a lighter or darker stain.

Note: Try mixing dyes for more variation; David’s team used a combination of beet and grape dyes for some of the eggs shown here.

 Soak the eggs overnight for deep jewel tones.
Above: Soak the eggs overnight for deep jewel tones.

“The marbling and variation in color is natural and a little unpredictable, so have fun experimenting,” said David.

 David and team displayed their eggs—60 in all—in blue-dyed cartons as a runner down the center of the table. Use standard egg cartons with the tops removed, or source a three-deep tray like the one shown here from Egg Cartons.
Above: David and team displayed their eggs—60 in all—in blue-dyed cartons as a runner down the center of the table. Use standard egg cartons with the tops removed, or source a three-deep tray like the one shown here from Egg Cartons.
 David&#8
Above: David’s team used a white gel pen to turn eggs into edible place cards.
The finished tablescape includes Kartio drinking glasses from Burkelman, a salt dish from Bomisch, and a dark blue tablecloth from Gray Line Linen. The knobby blue drinking glasses are vintage.
Above: The finished tablescape includes Kartio drinking glasses from Burkelman, a salt dish from Bomisch, and a dark blue tablecloth from Gray Line Linen. The knobby blue drinking glasses are vintage.
A simple arrangement of blue viburnum berries anchors the buffet table. The cake stand is from Sur La Table, the hand-carved wooden spoons are from Bomisch, and the striped coffee cups are from Anthropologie.
Above: A simple arrangement of blue viburnum berries anchors the buffet table. The cake stand is from Sur La Table, the hand-carved wooden spoons are from Bomisch, and the striped coffee cups are from Anthropologie.
The Fashion Chef in Brooklyn developed the menu: a tomato and chive frittata, fruit salad of berries, figs, and blood oranges with lemon juice and honey, and a salad of mâche rosettes.
Above: The Fashion Chef in Brooklyn developed the menu: a tomato and chive frittata, fruit salad of berries, figs, and blood oranges with lemon juice and honey, and a salad of mâche rosettes.

See more Remodelista collaborative Easter tablescapes here:

Easter in the Garden with Diane Keaton

Gwyneth Paltrow Easter Lunch in London

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0