Icon - Arrow LeftAn icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. Icon - Arrow RightAn icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. Icon - External LinkAn icon we use to indicate a button link is external. Icon - MessageThe icon we use to represent an email action. Icon - Down ChevronUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - CloseUsed to indicate a close action. Icon - Dropdown ArrowUsed to indicate a dropdown. Icon - Location PinUsed to showcase a location on a map. Icon - Zoom OutUsed to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Icon - Zoom InUsed to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Icon - SearchUsed to indicate a search action. Icon - EmailUsed to indicate an emai action. Icon - FacebookFacebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. flipboard Icon - InstagramInstagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - PinterestPinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - TwitterTwitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Icon - Check MarkA check mark for checkbox buttons.
You are reading

The Design Is in the Details: The Weavers House, Chan + Eayrs’ Huguenot-Inspired Oasis in London

Search

The Design Is in the Details: The Weavers House, Chan + Eayrs’ Huguenot-Inspired Oasis in London

October 1, 2018

If Zoe Chan Eayrs and Merlin Eayrs were actors, they would be of the method-acting variety—that is, intense, focused, and committed to the extreme.

The young husband-and-wife team may not be famous on stage or screen, but they are rising stars in the architecture and interior design world, a notable feat given their firm is not yet five years old. In 2016, we wrote about one of their first projects (see The Renegade Real Estate Developers: Chan + Eayrs in London), and since then, they’ve completed just two more homes. Why the slow-drip of work? Like method actors who stay in character long past comfort, the pair don’t keep standard 9-to-5 work hours. Instead, they physically move into the homes they are designing, so that they can fully inhabit the experience of living in those spaces. And they don’t move out until construction is complete and every detail, including the art on the walls and the books on the shelves, is in place. Call it method designing.

One of their newer projects: the Weavers House, situated on a corner lot in Spitalfields. The neighborhood was once home to London’s largest settlement of Huguenots (French Protestants), and the two used that history to inform their complete overhaul of the six-floor townhouse. During the time that they lived and worked in the Weavers House, they also brought another creation into the world—a baby girl—making this project truly a labor of love. Join us for a tour.

Photography by Michael Sinclair, courtesy of Chan + Eayrs.

chan and eayrs wilkes street 6
Above: Mother and child, seated on a vintage Danish banana sofa reupholstered in Cream Pierre Frey velvet. The couple moved into the Weavers House when Chan Eayrs was pregnant with their first baby. “It felt like we had built a nest for our family with a lot of love, time, and dedication,” they said on their website.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 5
Above: The building—which once housed a pub called Three Tun Tavern, close to a fruit and wool market (thus its current name)—had been gut renovated in 1990, and all historical details were expunged. The silver lining: Chan + Eayrs felt unburdened when it came time to reimagine the space. They could essentially start with a blank slate.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 7
Above: An antique Norwegian log burner sits atop a semicircle of Moroccan clay bricks in the living room. The art is by painter Faye Wei Wei.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 1
Above: While they didn’t want to be slaves to historical accuracy, they did want to create a connection to the building’s origins. With that in mind, they decided to use lime plaster and rough cross-sawn limed oak on the walls to reference the wood panelling found in traditional Huguenot townhouses.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 4
Above: The use of oak extended to the kitchen cabinetry, to create a sense of continuity. It “was like the entire house was a bespoke lesson in carpentry and history,” they said.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 2
Above: The dark finish on the twisted brass drawer pulls contrasts nicely with the rest of the brighter brass accents in the kitchen, while the oak cabinetry is a warm counterpoint to the Arabescato marble countertops.
chan eayres weavers house detail
Above: Every detail was considered: Notice how the stain on the lower section of the wall paneling is just a little darker for contrast.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 3
Above: You’ll also notice houseplants throughout the home. As Weavers House is located in the heart of the city, it was important to the couple to bring some greenery indoors.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 9
Above: The palette they chose also speaks to their desire to add natural elements. “We imbued the project with its own personality by responding to the lack of nature in the area, incorporating green and blue shades throughout,” they said.
chan eayres weavers house dining area
Above: On the lower level, Moroccan clay tiles in a herringbone pattern comprise the flooring.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 10
Above: One of their favorite features: Verde Luana green marble in the bath.
chan eayres weavers house bedroomo
Above: A bed built into a niche. The couple lived in the space for six months before starting renovations, and think the top level may have once housed the rooms of a silk weaver. Today, it’s an intimate retreat, complete with a master bedroom and a spa-like bath.
chan and eayrs wilkes street weavers house 16
Above: The ensuite bath features a freestanding soaking tub and a sculptural marble sink set into an alcove.
chan and eayrs wilkes street 14
Above: The wood flooring is original to the building.

Ready for more London house tours? See:

Have a Question or Comment About This Post?

Join the conversation

v5.0