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Zak+Fox Textiles: Inspired by Exotica

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Zak+Fox Textiles: Inspired by Exotica

Julie Carlson February 23, 2012

LA-born, NYC-based Zak Profera has just introduced his first line of textiles, called Zak+Fox, featuring patterns based on antique Japanese textiles, Matahari trade cloth, and Moroccan carpets.

"I was a dreamy child," Profera says. "I was always traveling to imaginary places in my mind; I think that's where these designs originated." The fabrics, which are printed in the US with water-based inks on Libeco linen from Belgium, are available directly from Zak+Fox.

Photographed on location at Temple Court by Zach Hankins; art direction by The Apiary.

Above: Profera's Shibu Inu, Shinji, sits atop a cushion covered in Volubilis (available in umber and alabaster), inspired by Roman ruins.

Above: A detail of Volubilis.

Above: A flag made from Zak + Fox's Karun fabric, inspired by Matahari trade cloth.

Above: A detail of Karun.

Above: Takigawa translates to "waterfall" and is a bold antidote to the traditional stripe; it's available in plum, ink, and snow/rust.

Above: A detail of Takigawa.

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