Vacation Like an Architect by

Issue 27 · Scandi Summerhouse · July 5, 2012

Vacation Like an Architect

Issue 27 · Scandi Summerhouse · July 5, 2012

Architects are famously particular when it comes to their surroundings, holiday houses included (I should know; my father is one). To the rescue; an architecture-oriented vacation house website; read on for details.

A couple of years ago, German architect Jan Hamer realized there was an opportunity for discerning holiday makers like himself. “If someone already lives in a beautiful environment in their everyday life, there is no reason why they should spend the best weeks of their year in a tin can." His solution? A website offering holiday homes with appealing architecture and interiors.

Among the offerings: Black and Bright house on the Danish Island of Mon, located on the southern coast, designed and built by Copenhagen-based architect Jan Henrik Jansen. Jansen spent three years building the house (mostly by himself), camping out on the site in the summer and bundled in a shed in the winter months. The result is a modern houseboat-like structure that capitalizes on the view toward the coast with plenty of access to the outdoors. To see more of the offerings, go to Urlaubs Architektur.

Photography by Andrea Gatzke.

Above: Siberian larch is used on the exterior siding and reclaimed wood is used for the flooring. Tree trunks columns provide a rustic note.

Above: The open living and kitchen area includes a custom kitchen; the counter is designed to conceal the sink and stove from the rest of the room. A pair of Tolomeo lamps are affixed to either end of the counter for lighting.

Above: The covered breezeway and deck serve to keep the house cool in summer and preserve heat in winter. A wooden bench is built into the wall.

Above: A wood-burning stove provides heat.

Above: Bunk accommodation off the living room with recessed lighting for each bed.

Above: The master bedroom in the upstairs attic room.

Above: Cross breezes keep the house cool in the summer.

Above: Oversized glass panels, typically used for shop windows, provide expansive views.

Above: The house is situated in a verdant meadow, with windows offering views of the countryside.



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