ISSUE 11  |  The Celtic Angle

Felin Fach Griffin in Wales

March 13, 2012 9:30 PM

BY Amara Holstein

The Felin Fach Griffin in south Wales offers weary travelers the knowledge that after a pint (or two) and a hearty meal, a comfortable bed is just a stroll upstairs.

Originally built in the 17th century as a coaching inn, the Felin Fach Griffin is an ideal spot to settle after rambling around rural back lanes with views of the Brecon Beacon mountains. Charles Inkin, who owns the place with brother Edmund, says, "Our modern version of a traditional inn feeds and waters the traveler before affording them the best night’s sleep they remember." Downstairs, leather sofas sit in front of an open fire and a dining room serves up local farm fare. Upstairs, seven rooms are simply decorated, and technology is held at bay (with only radios in the room).

The kitchen, which is overseen by Ross Bruce, recently won the County Dining Pub of the Year in the 2012 Good Pub Guide and also received a Bib Gourmand in this year's Michelin Guide. To book, visit Felin Fach Griffin.

Above: The exterior of the Felin Fach Griffin is painted an unexpected shade of terracotta.

Above: The heavy-timbered dining room has an Aga in the center and French doors that open onto the garden out back.

Above: A mismatched collection of chairs and long communal tables comprise the decor in the dining room.

Above: Guests can make their own toast from home-baked soda bread before sitting down for a breakfast that often includes eggs from the inn's hens.

Above: The rooms are furnished with antique pieces and Welsh wool blankets.

Above: The inn has its own garden, where it grows many greens (including a local delicacy, chervil root). Other items, such as cheese and meat, are procured from nearby farms.