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Designer Visit: Scott Lewis Landscape Architecture in San Francisco

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Designer Visit: Scott Lewis Landscape Architecture in San Francisco

Julie Carlson August 25, 2011

Located on the edge of the Presidio in San Francisco, bordered by eucalyptus and Monterey cypress trees, this compact urban garden by SF-based Scott Lewis Landscape Architecture merges contemporary forms with arboreal plantings to create a seemingly unstudied outdoor sanctuary. In reality—of course—an enormous amount of thought went into the planning of this 25-foot-wide backyard living area (read about it at the American Society of Landscape Architects). Oh, did we mention that the project won an ASLA award in 2010?

To see more work, go to Scott Lewis Landscape Architecture. To see images of the interiors of the house, go to Malcolm Davis. Photography by John Sutton.

Above: The rear of the classic shingled house opens onto a bluestone terrace.

Above: Steel doors open onto a deck area, which steps down to the bluestone terrace.

Above: The bluestone terrace leads to the ivy-covered art studio (a former garden shed).

Above: A pair of hoop chairs from Tongo provide seating.

Above: An aerial view of the bluestone terrace.

Above: An external iron grid envelops the artist's studio and provides a framework for an ivy cover.

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