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A Green Vitrine for Your Balcony

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A Green Vitrine for Your Balcony

Michelle Slatalla October 25, 2012

I've been haunted by the vision of this charming compact greenhouse ever since I spotted it in a blurry Pinterest image a few months back. Was it a product I could get my hands on…or a one-of-a-kind DIY project? These are the sorts of questions that keep me awake at 3 am. Yesterday I finally figured out the answer:

Above: The Finnish gardening supply company Kekkilä sells the Odlingsvitrin (which the company translates as "Green Vitrine") through its Hasselfors Garden line for home gardeners. A compact greenhouse for an urban garden, it's priced at 6995 kronor (or roughly $1,046 US); to order, go to Hasselsfors Garden. Photograph via Sköna hem.

No balcony? For a tabletop greenhouse, see "10 Easy Pieces: Wardian Cases."

Above: The easy-to-assemble Odlingsvitrin (L) is made of white-painted Finnish pine and the roof has "an automatic opening device that reacts to temperature," according to the manufacturer. "When the temperature rises high enough, the roof of the Vitrine automatically opens." Excess water is collected in a tray at the bottom of the case. A storage drawer (R) at the bottom of the greenhouse holds supplies.

What are you going to grow in there? For ideas, see "Required Reading: The Edible Balcony."

Above: The greenhouse has tempered glass panes and removable shelves. Image via Mensnallamama.

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