ISSUE 58  |  On the Mountain

10 Elegant Stairs from the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory

February 09, 2013 3:00 PM

BY Meredith Swinehart

Well, twelve, actually. We love stairs and know that you do, too. Here, a dozen elegant picks from members of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory.

Above: A wood staircase was one of the few original details that remained in this Italianate Brooklyn brownstone, set for a remodel by Elizabeth Roberts. The architect removed a bearing wall that sequestered the staircase to a hallway, making it newly visible from an open kitchen/living/dining room. The original oak floors were stained a dark chocolate brown, and the stair painted glossy black.

Above: In the stairwell of their dark and dramatic Shadow House, London-based Liddicoat & Goldhill whitewashed the wood steps and painted side brick walls matte black for total contrast. Says architect Sophie Goldhill, “We wanted the interior spaces to have maximum emotional effect.” For more from the firm, see In Praise of the Shadow House.

Above: In this Fort Greene townhouse remodel, Brooklyn-based Elizabeth Roberts designed a new stair to match the historic curved stair leading from the floor below. A new mahogany handrail seamlessly connects them both, and a glass door at the roof illuminates the stairwell, even when closed. For more from the designer, see Steal This Look: Elizabeth Roberts Brooklyn Bath.

Above: Oakland firm Medium Plenty designed this stair in a new family home in the Oakland Hills. The stair is definitively modern, but dark wood and black iron on a white palette is a timeless mix. Hear from Medium Plenty architect Ian Reed in our post The Architect Is In: Medium Plenty in San Francisco.

Above: NYC-based Wettling Architects designed this stair for a waterfront property on Shelter Island. The home's Atlantic views inspired the nautical look of the stairwell, and its simplicity perfectly suits the tenants–a young family and their guests. Photo by David Gilbert.

Above: In remodeling this 1950's Bernal Heights home, San Francisco-based Schwartz and Architecture added a modern open stair to transform the dated entryway. The architects sited the stair to neatly accommodate the homeowners' desire for a someday third-floor addition. For more from Schwartz and Architecture, see post Steal This Look: San Francisco Kitchen by Schwartz & Architecture. Photo by Matthew Millman.

Above: NYC-based Front Studio remodeled this 1912 Brooklyn brownstone, keeping as much of the original detailing as possible and refinishing it for a new life. For more from Front Studio, see post RADD Visit: Front Studio in New York.

Above: San Francisco architects Zack | de Vito designed this Sonoma County home for an East Coast couple making the big move out west. Interior bleached wood paneling frames the home's valley views, and the dark wood steps in this stairwell are a welcome contrast. For more from the firm, see Designer Visit: Zack | de Vito in San Francisco. Photo by Bruce Damonte.

Above: NYC-based Billinkoff Architecture arranged this West Village brownstone remodel around a five-story atrium, adding an Escher-inspired stair winding up to the roof. At the top, a skylight glides open onto the roof deck. An all-white stair means natural light has maximum play through the central void. For more from Billinkoff Architecture, see our post on creative uses for concrete in RADD Roundup: Concrete.

Above: Front Studio Architects included an über-modern skylit staircase in their remodel of a traditional multi-family Harlem townhouse. The stair leads from the eat-in kitchen to a bedroom addition above. For more from Front Studio, see A West Village Pied-a-Terre with a View. Photo by Cameron R. Neilson.

Above: Burr & McCallum Architects designed this Berkshires home around a couple's impressive collection of modern art. The architecture's clean lines and simple materials harmonize well with the artwork. For more from Burr & McCallum, see A Civilized Factory by Burr & McCallum Architects. Photo by Michael Lavin Flower.

Above: Hamptons-based Bates Masi + Architects designed this family retreat in Noyack, New York on a relatively modest budget and a small plot of land. In order to maximize water views at the rear of the house, the architects designed stairs to serve as both a passageway and as casual tiered seating. A broad outdoor stair parallels a narrower indoor stair, separated by a wall of glazing. Both are clad in stained wood decking. For more from Bates Masi, see our post A Midcentury Cabin in Amagansett.

Are you as obsessed with stairs as we are? See 321 photos of Staircases in our image gallery.