David Ling Architect

David Ling Architect

Services:

  • Architecture
  • Interior Design
  • Furniture Design
  • Commercial

Regions:

  • New York City & Mid-Atlantic
  • United Kingdom
  • Worldwide

Freund Apartment, New York City. The entrance foyer contains a cantilevered steel shelf in the foreground with a George Nakashima bench and curved blue wall in the background., David Ling Architect | Remodelista Architect / Designer Directory

Freund Apartment, New York City. The entrance foyer contains a cantilevered steel shelf in the foreground with a George Nakashima bench and curved blue wall in the background.

Informed by a multi-cultural background, nurtured in the United States, formed in Europe and with an umbilical cord still attached to China, David Ling founded David Ling Architects in 1992. After training as an associate with Richard Meier, I.M. Pei, and Emilio Ambasz, Ling established an international practice in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Composed of exhibition spaces, creative offices, high-end retail, high-end residences and institutional spaces Ling’s work has received numerous international awards such as the Interiors Magazine’s Annual Awards for Best Retail Design and again for Best Office Design, Interior Design Magazine’s Future Furniture Award and Kitchen and Bath Designer Leader Award, Municipal Arts Society’s National Design Award, architectural Bienal Miami + Beach Gold and Silver medals, Benjamin Moore’s Hue Awards for Best Residential Interiors, London’s Design Partnership Award for Best Retail Design and Best Exhibition Design from ICFF and London’s Grosvernor House Antiques Fair. Ling’s international press includes The New York Times, Interior Design, Interiors, House and Garden, Elle Décor, Metropolitan Home, Dwell, Wallpaper, Arte, Dwell Video, Casa da Abitare, Interni, Architektur und Wohnen, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Vogue, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, VM+SD, and Burlington Magazine to name a few. Ling’s client list includes Alberta Ferretti, Steve Wynn, Aaliyah, Blue Man Group, Sade’s band leader. Janet Kardon (former director of the Institute of Contemporary Art and the American Craft Museum), Monique Knowlton (art dealer). Ling has held teaching positions at Parsons School of Design and University of Nuremburg and has served on design juries at Interiors Magazine, Interior Design Magazine/Hospitality Magazine, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.

The Essence of Ling's Architecture is the artistic integration of space, form, light and function enriched by materiality. As all projects are treated as unique, so too is Ling’s creative vocabulary, tailored to diverse clients, sites, budgets and programs. Ling’s approach is a sculpted choreography of opposites, forming a dialogue of interlocking spaces and forms articulated in a crafted use of materials, ennobling space and form through materiality and light.

During his 17 years of independent practice Ling has had the pleasure and honor of collaborating with unique, successful, strong clients. Ling considers collaboration integral to the design process. Ling sees that problem finding, questioning, and understanding motivations are essential for finding the solutions, intelligent answers and creating alignments with his clients real desires, requirements and aspirations. Problems are welcome as design is often derived from the problem. During delivery of services, Ling’s practice is to resolve problems with transparent communication, understanding the client’s concerns and behaving with sensitivity and responsibility to the client. Ling’s approach is inclusive and consensus building, involving the client and contractor in communication and problem solving. Knowing that each perspective can contribute to the solution, Ling encourages an open discussion from design issues to the prosaic constraints of budget, schedule and details. It is in this way that Ling has executed his concepts for diverse clients, budgets and programs.

David Ling’s ultimate goal is to create something never said before, in a timeless manner.

Freund Apartment, New York City. The living room is based on the five basic elements from the I Ching: Fire (place), Water (trough), Wood (logs), Earth (granite fireplace mantle), and Metal (steel shelf, bases and inlay strips in the wall). The display niches conceal speakers and simultaneously provide an opportunity to display sculpture.

Freund Apartment, New York City. Dining room with custom design chandelier above out of gas pipe hung between sheets of hand sanded acrylic and bound together with shock cord.

Freund Apartment, New York City. The media room in the foreground is entered through a pair of sliding glass doors. The glass has been hand-sandblasted and hand-sealed to give an irregular diffuse effect.

Brown Grotta. New barn/old barn. Nestled in Connecticut farmland amidst rocky outcroppings, we added a new barn to existing barn and connected the two with an entrance stair hall.

Brown Grotta. Connecting the old barn with the new barn we repurposed salvaged materials throughout the house: beams to form the bridge and stair, repurposed bluestone sidewalk pavers for the flooring, reused existing double hung windows and the original barn flooring.

Brown Grotta. As one enters the stair hall, the open freestanding kitchen island greets the visitor. A corrugated wagon red metal sheet conceals the cooking area from the dining table and refers to the little red wagons from a pre-video game era. The railings are composed out of stock steel shapes and rods.

Flamm Apartment. The centerpiece for this Upper Eastside apartment is the illuminated library. Filled with the owner's collection of neurosurgery manuscripts and rare books, the shelves are backlit temper glass, strong enough to hold the weight of the books yet light enough to allow the patinated bindings come to life.

Flamm Apartment. We converted the Upper Eastside three-bedroom apartment into an open loft with flowing spaces. The dining room is connected seamlessly with the library to the right and entrance foyer to the left. A clerestory glass slot on the upper left-hand corner allows light from the master bedroom into the dining room and expands the space visually.

Flamm Apartment. The kitchen is open to the library in the background and dining room to the left. Sliding glass doors close off the kitchen for entertaining. The pearwood cabinets continue from the kitchen into the library to form a continuous window cabinet for maximized storage s well as concealing the heating and air conditioning units. The upper cabinets are faced with backlit acid-etched glass.

 

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